New Brunswick Part Deux

After leaving Prince Edward Island, we headed north in New Brunswick up the eastern coast.  We were heading for the Acadian Historical Village (https://www.villagehistoriqueacadien.com/en) but decided to stop along the way at the Aquarium in Shippagan. (http://aquariumnb.ca/site/en/home) The Aquarium was small but dedicated to fish and other sea creatures found locally and there was a short video explaining the importance of the cod fishing industry to the region also. As noted in our post on Louisbourg, the importance of Cod fishing in the 1600’s is one of those aspects of history which had completely escaped us. Like most people, we never understood why the name “Cape Cod” was so important back in the day. The visit was most interesting because, unlike most large aquariums, the focus was entirely local. The best part was the seal pool and the feeding of the three seals, Nina (the glutton), Oceania (an aged seal) and D’Amour (the youngest). (https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/seal-pup-born-in-shippagan-aquarium-1.1231465) They enjoyed performing for the crowd and both earned and enjoyed their herring dinner!

We then headed to the Shippagan Town campsite, a task made easier by big green signs painted directly on the road. We took our usual unserviced site. (http://www.camping.shippagan.com) This one, however, was buried in the woods and was beside the bay with spectacular views and we enjoyed a stroll along the wooden boardwalk after supper 

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Quite lovely. The mosquitoes were fierce but vast quantities of repellent helped with that.

We had trouble finding the Acadian Historical Village as it was shown in the wrong place on our map and the GPS had no record. A nice gentleman gave us directions and we found our way to a fascinating visit. The village has relocated and restored old building, homes and businesses, dating back to 1770 and showing aspects of Acadian life up to 1949. (Think Dearborn Village, the Weald and Downland, and similar collections.)

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Dear pig, are you willing, to sell for one shilling, your ring? Said the piggy …

Denise was fascinated to discover flax growing outside one home from the late 1700’s.  Inside, the costumed interpreter in period dress showed how the flax stalks were prepared, spun and then woven into a light weight linen fabric. 

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This was used to make clothing and bedding.  There were examples of wool being spun, rugs being hooked and other household needs being made.

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It was also fascinating to see the progression in the stoves throughout the ages. All using wood to burn, they became more sophisticated as the centuries passed.  

Fred loved the early garage with old fashioned pumps and three Model T Fords in the garage.

There were several industries in the village as well, a grist mill, a cooper’s shop, and, of course, the gentleman making brooms the hard way.

One can still spend the night in the 1920 hotel, though of course, we did not.

We did ride the farm cart AND the electric bus around the village one time before leaving, which was great fun.

Fred noticed a Belgian Camper in the parking lot as we left, built on a Mercedes truck similar to the 917.  The family were not around however so we could not exchange notes. They do not appear to have a website, but they are on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Adamis-on-the-road-1589720364408143/

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Next stop Quebec City!

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